Mishigamaa by Robert Krantz

Krantz submitted to the first issue of The Magnolia Review. His poems are magnetic and show poetic mastery. His language builds strong and lasting images. His chosen language sounds a melodious music to read aloud, a rhythm that you have to play to completion.

In “Pearl,” the speaker begins with, “I remember the wheat fields / of Iowa and the photograph / of you I took with me, / and how neither ever really ended.” The speaker continues, “We ate and loved / much in that decade, / collided with stars, / authored myths / and stuffed our age-spotted hands / into denim pockets.” The image and sound carries through the lines, building to the final image of “The half shells we find on beaches / were once a thing joined together, / breathing, and grinding / new pearls into place.” The poem builds like a pearl, with the images stringing together into a cohesive piece.

Laundry can be boring. The speaker reflects on his fellow laundry-doers in “Load,” where “The bachelors in the laundromat / spill their words / like bleach / on black clothes, / speak of condos / and alimonies— / thick humidities turning.” The clothes transform into more, they are “damp thoughts” as they wash, and they “…breathe[s] / restless poems / into my blues and grays. / Soon this summer rain / will end, volume of water / striking pavement / will knob itself silent.” Krantz ends the poem with a moment that draws the reader back to the reality of the laundromat, “The cash machine, / against the flecked wall, / reminds me to change.”

The collection ends with “Pathfinder,” about a hatchet and its story. It shares the story of two boys cutting down a tree and of a sibling wrestling game gone awry.

Overall, Krantz’s poems are musical and full of images that inspire looking at mundane events in a new and interesting way. I look forward to reading more of Krantz’s work.

Check out Robert‘s work in Volume 1, Issue 1, and a review of Gargoyles in Volume 2, Issue 2.

Volume 4, Issue 2 is Here!

The issue is available as a PDF: TMR Volume 4 Issue 2.

The optional theme is comics, be it drawn in sequential images or just plain funny.

Contributors: Gershon Ben-Avraham, Susan P. Blevins, Mela Blust, Charles W. Brice, Aria Callaham, Joan Colby, Holly Day, Darren C. Demaree, Adam Durso, Kelcey Parker Ervick, Sarah A. Etlinger, GTimothy Gordon, John Grey, Jack D. Harvey, Aloura Hattendorf, Henry Hitz, Diane Hoffman, A.J. Huffman, Phil Huffy, James Croal Jackson, Lonnie James, Gloria DeVidas Kirchheimer, Matthew J. Kreglow, Claire Martin, Megan Miazgowicz, Jennifer Davis Michael, Paul Mills, TJ Neathery, Simon Perchik, Steven B. Rosenfeld, David Anthony Sam, William L. Spencer, David Spicer, Chuck Thompson, Dennis Trujillo, Bess Vanrenen, Maryfrances Wagner, Michael Whelan, Theresa Williams, and Kelsey Zimmerman.

Reviews: Hold Me Gorilla Monsoon by Colette Arrand, Auri by Auri, Internet Yearnings by Gary Beck, Mnemosyne’s Hand: Poems by Charles W. Brice, Her Secret Husband by Abbey Faith, The Future by From Ashes to NewBurn Site In Bloom by Jamie HoughtonRookland by Jesse Minkert, Beach Dweller Manifesto by Leah MuellerGhost Matter by Jade RamseyHeavenly Whispers by Roger SipplPermanent Change of Station by Lisa Stice, and i’m fine: A Haiku Collection About Mental Illness by Jamie Winters.

Winner of The Magnolia Review Ink Award: Theresa Williams, for “From The Diary of Lea Knight,” chosen by Dom Fonce.

Charles W. Brice

Pushcart Prize nominated poet, Charles W. Brice, Ph.D., is a retired psychoanalyst and is the author of Flashcuts Out of Chaos (WordTech Editions, 2016) and of Mnemosyne’s Hand (WordTech Editions, 2018). His poetry, short stories, reviews, and nonfiction pieces have appeared in over seventy publications including Literal Latte, The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Psychiatry, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, The Atlanta Review, Hawaii Review, The Main Street Rag, Chiron Review, Fifth Wednesday Journal, The Paterson Literary Review, Plainsongs and elsewhere. His poem, “Identification,” was anthologized along with poems by W.H. Auden, Hilda Doolittle, Philip Larkin, Stephen Dobyns, Louise Gluck, Anne Sexton, and others in, Climate of Opinion: Sigmund Freud in Poetry, Irene Willis (Ed.), (International Psychoanalytic Books, 2017).

Sis, Volume 4, Issue 2
Review, Mnemosyne’s Hand: Poems, Volume 4, Issue 2

Her Secret Husband–Review

Fara West is not your typical Victorian lady. She prefers riding horses and wearing men’s clothes to drinking tea and wearing dresses to balls. So when her father arranges a marriage with Marc Ranlyn, she maintains her independence and does not become the submissive wife he desires. But then Marc sails for America on business and dies in a shipwreck. She is free from her loveless marriage.

Except Marc has an identical twin. And six siblings he never told her about. When Fara meets Avetis, she sees her dead husband Marc. Avetis assumes Marc’s identity so he can finally provide for his five remaining siblings and find them suitable marriage partners. It is not long before Avetis and Fara fall in love. Overcoming the abusive history with Marc, it takes time for Fara to trust Avetis to not repeat Marc’s abuses and to not waste her family fortune.

Faith focuses on Fara’s and Avetis’s love story, and she also dips into the lives and perspectives of the siblings, Marc, and Avetis’s friend Phoenix Alden. Marley is the second oldest, and she helps Avetis raise their siblings after the deaths of their parents. Kitty is interested in fashion and is forthright and nosy. Emory reads books and is too shy to speak. The youngest twins, Enoch and Reuben, are rambunctious. Enoch cares for animals, especially his pet lizard Bug. The reader meets Phoenix Alden, a bookseller who is friends with Avetis. When customers complain about wanting more Lewis Carroll, Phoenix smirks and says, “‘What it must be like to be a child lucky enough to have a mother who purchases books for you. When I was a boy, I found amusement in tossing rocks between my palms.’”

Her Secret Husband is an entertaining read, filled with lovable characters, a memorable love story, and plenty of adventures and surprises as the Ranlyn family explores London and enters society to find marriage partners.

Pick up a copy of Her Secret Husband when it is released June 1, 2018, here from Red Sage Publishing, Inc. Check out Abbey Faith’s Facebook page for more information about upcoming titles about the Ranlyn family, and Abbey Faith’s blog here.

Roger Sippl

Roger Sippl studied creative writing at UC Irvine, UC Berkeley and Stanford Continuing Studies. He has enjoyed being published in a couple dozen online and print literary journals and anthologies over the years. While a student at Berkeley, Sippl was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and was treated for thirteen months with a mixture of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, seriously challenging him in many ways, but allowing him to live relapse-free to this day, forty-three years later. So, is this poem about an old love reappearing, or just the thought of her reappearing, or is it about cancer coming back, or all and none of these? Sippl has just self-published a book of poetry, Heavenly Whispers, and it is available from Amazon. He is finishing two other poetry books, Real Nature and Bridgehampton, which should be on Amazon in approximately the April timeframe. Samples of poems from those books are on his writing website, www.rogersippl.com.

Again, Volume 4, Issue 1
Interview
Review, Heavenly Whispers, Volume 4, Issue 2

Leah Mueller

Leah Mueller is an indie writer from Tacoma, Washington. She is the author of two chapbooks, Queen of Dorksville (Crisis Chronicles Press) and Political Apnea (Locofo Chaps) and three books, Allergic to Everything, (Writing Knights Press) Beach Dweller Manifesto (Writing Knights) and The Underside of the Snake (Red Ferret Press). Her work appears in Blunderbuss, Outlook Springs, Atticus Review, and many anthologies. She was a featured poet at the 2015 New York Poetry Festival, and a runner-up in the 2012 Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry contest.

Nyctohylophobia, Volume 4, Issue 1
Interview
Review, Beach Dweller Manifesto, Volume 4, Issue 2

Jesse Minkert

Jesse Minkert lives in Seattle. In 2008, Wood Works Press published his collection of microstories, Shortness of Breath & Other Symptoms. His work has appeared in about fifty journals. Finishing Line Press will release his collection, Rookland, in 2017. He is a 2016 Pushcart nominee.

October and Chain Link Fence, Volume 3, Issue 2
Interview
Review, Rookland, Volume 4, Issue 2