Volume 5, Issue 2


The issue is available here.

Campus at night by Riku Ylönen

The optional theme is Questions.

Contributors: Bill Abbott, Maya Alexandri, Gary Beck, Adam Levon Brown, Frank De Canio, Kayson Carlin, Satya Dash, Maria Espinosa, Marie Fields, Alexander Garza, Laura Goodman, Kara Goughnour, Jacob Greb, A. Elizabeth Herting, Mark Hudson, Maranda Huffort, Phil Huffy, Caitlin Johnson, Thomas Kearnes, J.D. Kotzman, Michelle Kouzmine, Courtney LeBlanc, Kate Maruyama, John Maurer, Andrew Miller, Keith Moul, Ben Nardolilli, Robert P. Parker, Fabrice Poussin, Nicolas Ridley, Taylor Risinger, John Timothy Robinson, David Rogers, David Anthony Sam, Jessica Seaborn, Margarita Serafimova, David K. Slay, J. Conrad Smith, J.R. Solonche, J.B. Stone, Richard Weaver, Katie Wolf, and Riku Ylönen.

Reviews: The Anatomical Venus by Helen Ivory (Reviewed by Michael Paul Hogan)

Winner of The Magnolia Review Ink Award to be announced!



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Riku Ylönen

Riku Ylönen is an amateur photographer from Central Finland. He has a Master’s Degree in Philosophy, specialized to language philosophy and semiotics, from Jyväskylä University. Ylönen studied creative writing in Open University of Jyväskylä, and his poems have been published in anthologies. He was also a finalist in the national poetry slam competition, as well as annual competition of Kauhava city “Puukko ja runo” (puukko knife and poetry). Among photographing, drawing and writing, Ylönen is interested in bouldering and collecting bladed weapons.

aamupitsi, Harbour, Heartseed, The Gates Within, Meditation, unitalvi, and Campus at Night, Volume 5, Issue 2

Keith Moul

Keith Moul is a poet of place, a photographer of the distinction light adds to place. Both his poems and photos are published widely. His photos are digital, striving for high contrast and saturation, which makes his vision colorful (or weak, requiring enhancement).

OR 108 US 101 Coquille River Lighthouse, WA 122 House Garden, MO 519 St. Louis, OR 184-1 Central, Volume 5, Issue 2

Theresa Williams–Interview

Describe your creative space. Do you work at home, in public spaces, etc.?

I work at home. Since all our children moved out, I have taken over half of the house. In one room I have an art desk.  In another room I have my computer and most of my books. And in still another, I have a big table where with a paper cutter, various staplers, more books, and a tall tool box where I keep my art papers and finished work.

What kind of materials do you use? What mediums do you work in?

Water and Copic proof markers, Copic markers, colored pencils, pastels, and gel pens, mostly.

What is your routine for art? Do you always sketch first?

Not always. For The Diary of Lea Knight, I sometimes draw images on paper and glue them on the journal pages. That way if the picture doesn’t turn out as well as I’d like, I can try again. I think of it like doing a collage. Sometimes if I feel confident, I draw directly on the journal pages.

How long have you been making art? When did you start making art?

Since I was a child. I ALWAYS wanted to be an artist first. I got an undergraduate degree in studio art at East Carolina University. When I graduated, though, I got two Master’s degrees in English and upon graduation taught English courses at the university level. I thought it was a more stable path financially. I didn’t draw for a long time. I came back to it about 7 years ago. My plan all along was to somehow combine art and writing.

Who is your intended, or ideal, audience? Who do you make art for?

I make it for myself first. I make the sort of thing I’d like to see or to buy.  I want to have fun with my art.  I trust that my concerns are universal enough that they will connect with others. My ideal audience would be people interested in the inner life of a character, not so much lots of action.

What inspires you to create? If you are blocked, what do you do?

I get curious about how a person would handle certain difficult situations. I’ve written a lot about death because I think that’s the hardest experience for people to come to terms with. So a lot of my work has to do with loss and dealing with loss. The Diary of Lea Knight, for example, is about a woman who lost a baby and is in a rocky marriage. Her diary is her way of coming to terms with hard times.  If I come to a standstill, I read whatever interests me. I have lots of books and am always buying more. I also have lots of art books and I look at them to get ideas about subject and composition. I rarely get blocked anymore, but I do come to a pause sometimes, and then I need to think about where to go next.

What other things do you do besides art? Do you dance or play golf, etc.?

I’m really mainly consumed with art and writing. I don’t do a lot of other activities. I teach nine months out of the year, and that takes a lot of time. So when summer comes, I just want to be creative. I don’t want distractions.

What is your favorite part of the creative process?

The surprise. Each day is an opportunity to explore something different. I don’t like to plan too far ahead with my work. I have a rough plan but work organically. For instance, Lea’s birthday diary entry was only supposed to be four pages or so, but the idea grew as I worked. It took me places I hadn’t planned to go. It was exhilarating.

What is your advice to aspiring artists?

Just to do it. Inspiration is overrated. Your ideas come from working. You discover as you go. Work with archetypes. Use what’s universal but discover the personal, too. To find your personal archetypes, you have to draw and sketch a lot of pictures; that’s the only way. Don’t emulate any certain style. Forget about being Leonardo Da Vinci or anyone else. Find your own style.

 

Check out Theresa’s work in Volume 4, Issue 2, and upcoming in Volume 5, Issue 1.

Theresa won The Magnolia Review Ink Award for “From the Diary of Lea Knight” in Volume 4, Issue 2. Check out the announcement here.

Flash Sale!

FLASH SALE! $5 an issue plus free shipping! Click here for more information on how to snag this deal on copies of Volume 4, Issue 1.